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Overclocking

I got a new set of parts to build up a system. The system is an overclocker’s dream. The motherboard is a Gigabyte GA-H55-USB3 which has all the latest and greatest, USB 3, SATA 3 DVI output, 5.1 and 7.1 audio support and Intel’s latest socket. The drivers for the mobo include the ability from a GUI to modify the BIOS settings to allow overclocking of the CPU (pushing the CPU faster than intended or spec’d). The CPU I got is an Intel Core I5 dual core unlocked CPU which allows overclocking. Seems Intel is finally embracing the idea of overclocking. People do it anyway so find a way to get a buck or two more. The heat sink for this puppy is designed for cooling a Ninja 3. This is a 5.5 inch high aluminum fin, heat pipe based cooler. It is amazing. It’s designed to be quiet and efficient. If you are going to overclock you need to deal with heat. All of these components were chosen for me by my good friend Jason. So with all of the right pieces in hand it’s time to do some overclocking. And let me tell you … this baby was born to run.

First off is the GUI that allows some control of overclocking. More options and finer control can be had inside the BIOS.

As you can see the program allows modification of the multiplier as well as the front side bus allowing full control of the CPU speed.

The tools for this review were CPU Z to confirm the over clock, and Coretemp to monitor temperature. I did note the tools and the BIOS settings were not always in agreement. Odd.

To benchmark the improvement in processor power I will use video encoding. It pushes a CPU to the max and it’s something I do so it’s nice to see how it handles it. Without further a due here are the results.

Freq % overclok Encode time % imp encode Max temp FSB % overclock FSB Multiplier
3.19 NA 384 NA 54 133 NA 24
3.36 5.3 338 12 57 140 5.4 24
3.6 12.9 317 17.4 61 150 12.8 24
3.84 20.3 298 22.4 71 160 20.3 24
4.16 30.4 283 26.3 71 160 20.3 26
4.48 40.4 269 30 75 166 24.8 27

Attempts to overclock beyond this ended up in an unstable system. The impressive thing is once I rebooted into BIOS there was a nice clear message saying the system had crashed due to overclocking 🙂

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December 29, 2010 - Posted by | Uncategorized

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