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Advanced elements AE1012 Inflatable kayak

Ok I know this is a little off my normal topic, but thought I’d share anyway. I have loved kayaking every time I have tried it. The major stumbling block to buying one has been putting a roof rack on my car. Those of you that know (and some of you who love me :)) know I am a bit obsessive about my car. And the thought of on my own lifting a clumsy, 40 lb+ kayak over my head onto the roof rack just sounded like a pulled back waiting to happen. So I haven’t bought one … And then a friend (thanks Val) last fall introduced me to products from this company. And to make matters even better another friend (thanks John) offered to lend me one to try! Can you believe my luck!

Advanced elements web site

So what I am looking for is a kayak to take on short trips in rivers near me. 1-2 hour trips near home in gentle flowing rivers. The kayack is about the size of a hockey bag folded up and weighs 36 lbs. The newer hockey backs come on wheels, this could use that idea 🙂 The bag even includes a pouch for the manual. A nice touch would have been to include a laminated picture, sadly they didn’t.

Setting up this kayak is as simple as it appears in the videos on Youtube. I won’t bother making one there are tons out there already. Here’s one for a slightly different model. The first time I tried to set this up after watching the videos it took me 15 minutes, and deflation even less. It really is as simple and easy as it seems. A standard high capacity pump just like you’d use for an air mattress is all you need. Absolutely no need for a power pump, don’t waste your time, money and hearing (the damn things are loud). There is one trick, these pumps have an inflation and a deflation port allowing you to suck the air out of the kayak to make disassembly even faster. The vales on the boat include a switch between inflation and deflation making it easier to pump it up and then remove the pump loosing little to know air. Finding each of the tubes to inflate can be a bit challenging and they could have done a better job in the manual to show them. The caps for the inflation ports are tethered to the boat so you don’t loose them, but unfortunately they are pretty easy to snap off (I did on first use). Now your challenged to not loose the cap 😦

The bottom of the boat is covered in a rubber coating over the firm front and back of the boat. But this can easily be damaged dragging the boat so be careful. They could have made this more robust …

Once in the water the boat because of it’s width is surprisingly stable. More so than other Kayaks I’ve been in. Getting in is made easier if you undo the front zipper.

There’s an adjustable seat back that makes the boat a whole lot more comfortable. I’m not all that tall at 5’9, with a distance of 40 inches from my toes to my waste and my feet are at the end of the boat with the seat mostly to the back. So if your super tall this boat might not fit. There is a bit of storage on the back of the seat, but not all that convenient to get at.

The boat has a little keel and hard parts in the boat that make it track as well as, and as fast as a normal kayak. I have to say I was thoroughly impressed. Even in a fairly windy day (24km/h) it stayed on track and was easy to handle. I don’t have all the right words and phrases, I’m a beginner when it comes to kayaks, but this had what I wanted from a performance point of view.

If there is one thing missing it would be a water proof storage compartment for your gadgets and a bottle holder. You can buy your own and strap them into the front of the boat but this seems like a simple thing they could have added

Folding it up and getting it back in the bag was simple and easy, easier than I thought. The hard parts of the kayak make it obvious where to fold it up. The bottom inside of the kayak has a rubber coating making it easy to dry off the boat. I wish they had used the same coating on the deck of the boat. When your paddling the water from the paddle gets the deck quite wet.

The boat all in all is amazing, there are always things that could have been improved, but that said this is an impressively designed and executed product. Something you don’t often hear from me 🙂

Owners manual

As an interesting side note, the Garmin Fenix 3 that I love has a rowing mode. In this mode you get lots of stats about your rowing, as well as a nice map of your trek. Here’s a sample of the data you get from it.

And another interesting side note, I did three different types of exercises and compared the calorie counts. The results are interesting.

If your looking to pick one of these up The Paddle Store as well as Steveston Marine (in BC)here in Canada carry them.

June 12, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Jumbl Bluetooth headset/receiver

I know, I know, not another bluetooth receiver … As you maye have guessed I am having trouble finding one to do exactly what I want. I find it odd, because with the move of iPhone 7 to removing the 3.5mm jack I would have thought these would be become even more popular. What do I know … So I now try this one … Nice and small with nice BIG (sort of) buttons. And this time they made sure volume controls are two of them. Is that not blatantly obvious? Moving on … The device has a standard 3.5 mm audio plug and is compatible with both 3 pin stereo and 4 pin stereo and mic headphones. It charges with a standard micro USB charger. This unit seems to be sold under a number of names (judging from physical appearance). This includes a Noisehush and Griffin iTrip, from a preliminary look, there may be others.

The unit clips to clothes with what appears to be a fairly robust clip that just might not break as easily as others in the past.

Spec wise they quote: “On a single charge, the built-in 120mAh rechargeable li-polymer battery keeps you going for 8 hours of music playback, 10 hours of hands-free call time, and up to 150 hours of standby.” The unit from dead took just under two hours to charge and you can use it while it’s being charged. It claims to be the newer bluetooth 4 spec, but there is no mention of APTX support. The iPhone doesn’t support APTX so not an issue for me.

It is compatible with the iPhone bluetooth battery headset widget. In case your new to this it’s a widget called battery that you can see by swiping to the left from the home screen. If the bluetooth headset is attached you will see the battery status of the headset in what appears to be 20% increments (for this headset anyway). There is no alert of an almost dead headset and I didn’t find any apps that you can use to do this. I found the count went from 100% to 80, then 60 and then dead with only a brief warning. I got approx 7 hours streaming battery life so the 8 seems possible. But the misleading 60% to dead is disappointing. Not sure how common this is. The widget also does not show the state of charge of the headset.

Pairing the device was easy, push and hold the center button until the two lights flash and away you go. Turning it on requires you to push and hold the center button but just long enough to turn it on without putting it in pairing mode. I found this hit or miss. The easiest way is to carefully listen to the beep or watch for the blue LED to come on, takes about 2 seconds. Once powered on you need to wait a bit of time, what seemed longer than most other bluetooth headsets before you could use it for streaming music. And sometimes in spite of being connected as a phone headset the music would not stream to it and I had to turn it off and back on and try again. I found this buggy at best. Once connected it works well and sound quality is good, with no drop outs.

When a call comes in you simply press the center button to accept and end the call and then your back to your music. It works smoothly.

There does not seem to be a way to call up SIRI … pooh.

When pressing the buttons on the outside (volume or fwd/rwd) it’s pretty easy, especially with gloves, to hit the play pause instead.

All in all this is a good device, not perfect, but it does work, has good battery life and sound quality is good.

June 2, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Mengk bluetooth headset Eurobird HM2000

I was looking for an inexpensive bluetooth headset to replace my iKross BT19 which is no longer available. I saw this one and decided to try it.

Size and weight are good, buttons are very minimalistic, so much so as to make this device super clumsy to use. There is a fwd/rwd button that if you push and hold act as the volume up and down. Seems to me one would use volume more so why it isn’t the one that does not require holding is beyond me. The button on the front turns the unit on, and changes between streaming bluetooth and FM and powering off. Getting the front button right is all about pushing and holding just the right amount of time. Too long and you just powered it off. It’s irritating

The 3.5mm audio plug is NOT compatible with 4 pin stereo/mic headsets, only stereo ones. Sound quality is really not great even in blutooth streaming.

FM radio is reasonable well done and includes simple to use audio prompts in english.

The device can not be used while charging so it is useless as a permanent bridge.

In the end I returned this device due to poor audio quality, the lack of support for a 4 pin audio plug and maddening usability.

May 27, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Sony Ericsson MW600 bluetooth headset review

When I mountain bike I love listening to music. But having a wire to the phone in your pocket is a pain (sometimes literally). So I like to use a bluetooth headset. It also makes it possible to take a call if there was something urgent. In the past I have owned a Samsung HS3000 as well as an iKross BT19, both of which I liked and used a lot, but neither are still available and both are either broken or lost. I particularly liked the big buttons on the iKross for use with gloves while riding … Finding a replacement has been surprisingly challenging. One of the problems I have is that for whatever reason in ear headphones, never stay in place on me.

So I thought I’d try this one. First off, it’s worth noting that this device is no longer sold by Sony Ericsson so if you want one buy it while you can. There are some still on Amazon.

First off the headphone connector is a standard 3.5mm, and is compatible with both stereo (3 pin) and stereo with a mic (4 pin) headphones. This comes in handy. Sound wise this is one of the best to date with the right headphones. The included ones are fine, a little lacking in base and as usual they don’t stay in my ears.

The unit is capable of pairing with two devices simultaneously, so say a phone and tablet.

Size wise, it’s about the size of a AA battery and light. Buttons are a power and micro USB for charging on the end, fwd/rwd/play-pause on the bottom and a bizarre slider for volume on the top. If there is a weakness or annoying thing about this device it’s the volume. You slide your finger along it and a visual slider comes up on the display and you slide up or down. It’s hokey at best. I have no idea what they were thinking of when they decided to do this. And it is impossible with any kind of gloves on. I could go on about how stupid this is … On the front is a single easy to use button that allows you to receive and end incoming calls. Double click and up comes SIRI! Perfect

There is an OLED display on the unit and it works super well … kind of. The display will show you the FM station your on (more about FM in a bit), the song playing when on bluetooth streaming, shows the bluetooth connection and battery state, time, and who is calling . The display is comprehensive in what it displays … but … and there is always a but, the OLED display is completely unreadable in any amount of sunlight. Really bad. And there is no way to tell what radio station your listening to without the display. There are no audio prompt whatsoever on this device. An over sight IMHO.

Sadly the device can not be used while charging so you could not use this device as a permanent bluetooth receiver. Dumb and limiting.

The clip that holds it to your clothes is quite soft and the spring is not all that robust. I can only hope it will last.

Battery life is claimed to be talk time up to 11 hours, standby time up to 500 hours, stream time up to 8 hours 30 mins, FM radio playing time up to 11 hours and charging time approximately 2 hours. Like most devices in this category there is no accurate way to tell the current battery status. The display shows the battery status but it’s too small to be able to discern much of anything.

There is an FM radio on this device and it works reasonable well and supports RDS so you get the radio stations call sign and the song playing. Impressive! Press and hold fwd/rwd and it will scan for the next radio station it finds. Reception seemed ok.

This headset can be paired to two devices at the same time, and from the headset menu you can choose which one you want to listen to and control. It’s not as seamless as the HS3000 but at least it does work.

If there was anything I wished most for, it would be an app that would run on the phone and allow you to control and see what’s going on with the headset. Now to be honest, I have NEVER seen anyone do this, but one can dream.

This headset does not support the Apple ability to display the headset’s battery status.

All in all I am pretty happy with this headset. The biggest niggle would be the silly volume control. But given how good everything else is on this headset, I guess its not so bad. But why they felt it necessary to reinvent the wheel is beyond me. There does seem to be a slightly newer model Sony SBH54.

May 24, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How to use HRV

I last did a post about HRV, an introduction of sorts, I’ve learned a little more so I thought it was time for another post on the subject. HRV or heart rate variability is a way to tell what shape your body is mentally and physically. It can be used to judge when it’s time to go all out on the next workout and when it’s time for a light stroll. It can be used to measure physical and mental stress as well. Some devices such as Garmin Vivosmart 3 and Lifetrak Zoom HRV are attempting to do all day HRV measurements. How good or accurate (or even useful) these are is very much a TBD. I am skeptical.

HRV is a measure of the variance of time between heart beats. A healthy and well rested system can react quickly to needs of the body. There is good HRV and bad HRV but the reality is there is a range. Too high is bad and an indication of one issue, too low is bad and an indication of another issue. Now I am not a Dr, I am an engineer :). So I will make no attempt to explain the physiology of any of this. What I will try and do is discuss what you can glean from HRV and how to use it.

First up is tools, you will need a highly accurate heart rate monitor. For now that seems to be chest straps. I have a Wahoo TICKR and a Polar H7 both of which seem to do just fine with HRV and give consistent readings. Next up is an app on your phone. The last time around I put a few through their paces and decided on EliteHRV. It is simple to use, easy to understand and works well. If there is anything I wish for, is a portal, where I could see the data offline, on something other than my little phone screen. Oddly enough the app does send the data up to the cloud, I guess for their use.

Taking a measurement is pretty simple, get your chest strap, wet it (most chest straps have to be wet to be accurate), sit still start the app and wait two minutes. Two minutes seems to be about the right amount of time to get a reliable accurate consistent HRV reading. The more still you are the better the measurement. For the first couple of days you will get nothing out of the app while it figures out your baseline, normal, state. Once done you are now ready to start getting some meaningful data out of the app.

I am not going to try and discuss HRV during an activity, at this point I have not figured out what it means, or even how accurate or useful it might be,

So let’s get started. After taking measurements for a bit it was time to see what shape I was in before a ride. So I took the measurement, and as you can see I am in the green and good to go! The intra chart shows a pretty stable reading.

The reading isn’t right in the middle of perfection but it’s well within the range of what it considers good for me. So off I go on a ride. I rode for 2.5 hours, and then retook my measurement. Sure enough it shows that my body has been under some considerable exertion for me). My HRV had dropped from 59 in the morning to 36 after the ride. The only thing missing would have been a nice simple dial again. I have no idea why they only do this for morning readings.

So the next morning I measure my HRV again. Here you see I have recovered from 36 back up to 51, but it’s still in the yellow meaning if I were to go out an hard exercise it might be a bad idea. I would be at risk of performing badly or even injuring myself pulling muscles and the like.

By the next day you can see my HRV had recovered back up to 58 (now two mornings, and roughly 36 hours after my ride). As an interesting note, my Garmin Fenix 3 gives you a guess at what it thinks is your time to recover from your workout, and it guessed 29 hours so in the same range.

Now to see the affect of things other than exercise, I had a really bad night of sleep. And low and behold my HRV, down to 51, reflected it and showed a deccrease and the fact that I would not be in a good place to do a hard workout, something I felt anyway.

Here’s another pre exercise HRV, then a post exercise and then the next morning. This time it dropped from 54 to 43. This was an easier ride 688 calories Vs 1244 (according to my Fenix 3) from the previous example and as you can see my HRV dropped only 11 this time Vs 23. And as you can see it took less time to recover from my exercise, the next morning I would have been good to go again for another workout (albeit just barely).

And for completeness here is an almost perfect HRV after a good long nights rest. Right smack in the middle of the good range!

This last image is a way of seeing it all in one. You can see here it’s about a range. Too high is bad, too low is bad. It’s about distance from center of your normal. You get the best readings and accuracy when you take your HRV regularly.

May 19, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Leg based heart rate monitors

I’m always looking around for new ways to track my heart rate. In my mind the heart rate can tell a lot about you and your day. Warning … This post is going to be a bit of a ramble. A couple of new products have come on the market and I have been thinking of splurging on. The new Garmin Vivosmart 3 looks interesting and includes true all day heart rate monitoring. This allows you to get a couple interesting tid bits of information including your resting heart rate and your HRV. HRV (heart rate variability) is a measure of how stressed/tired/exhausted you may be and can be used to guide you in when and how long/hard you ought to work out. A quick read on DC Rainmakers web site reveals, as expected, wrist based heart rate monitoring for cycling is not practical. In Ray’s words “In case it’s not overwhelmingly obvious above (the yellow line): It sucked.  Badly.” On the positive side it would give me more data in the Garmin connect world, and would land all my data including sleep/tracking all in one place, the holy grail. So if I bought this one, I wouldn’t be using it on my rides.

Another gadget that caught my eye and what triggered this post is the Lifetrak Zoom HRV. This is again a wrist based all day heart rate monitor that also provides HRV (thus the name Captain Obvious :)). One of the unique things they did was provide an optional arm/leg band so you can move the sensor to somewhere it might get more accurate data during workouts (ie off the wrist). They claim they can get accurate data from multiple places on the body. So it got me thinking, I wonder if it’s actually possible to get an accurate heart rate from the leg? The lifetrak even recommends using it on the leg for cycling in which case it will also get cadence (rate of rotation of the peddles). Hmmmm.

And thus we have the experiment. So first off, I do not own a LifeTrak Zoom HRV, I do however own a Scosche rhythm + that can be worn on the leg. I’ve never seen anything talking about whether you can or can not do this so …. I wore the sensor on the leg above the calf, below the knee. This insured it wouldn’t fall off when cycling.

One of the first things you have to ask yourself is what are you trying to do with the heart rate? If you are trying to use it to keep your workout in zones then accurate data is a MUST. If all you want is an accurate calorie count then accuracy of the data at a given point is less important, average are all that really matter.

First off lets have a look at simple sedentary measurement. Sitting around not doing much. In this case the data actually looks quite promising. Both the point accuracy and average look good. For this comparison I used a polar h7 chest strap.


Expecting more than a 10% accuracy is unrealistic in this market segment IMHO, however having a variance of 8 bpm is getting up there as impractical for use for heart rate zone management.

Now let’s have a look at quick stair climb. This time the leg will actually be doing something. This time around it looks bad. There’s a short period of time where it’s just an act of fiction. Then a period of time where it lags (somewhat expected) and lastly it seems to somehow catch up.


Again it did reasonably ok from averages point of view, but bad for point comparisons.

Now I went on a short walk 20 mins. In this case for the most part the data tracked reasonably well, although there’s some noticeable lag in the heart rate being detected on the leg, and then something bizarre on the end of the graph.

And last but not least we get to my real use case, cycling. Visually comparing the data during the ride the leg based heart rate monitor was REALLY BAD. Like unusable, an utter act of fiction. If you were using it to guide you in zones you would be completely off. Average wise, shockingly it’s not so bad. I can only imagine the pounding of mountain biking could make this even worse.

Update:
I had another thought … What about the ankle, would it be any better? Again the scosche is on the ankle and the tickr is a chest strap. As you can see, other than an odd drop out for a period of time it was not totally out to lunch. Now that said, again, it would not be accurate enough to use for keeping you in zones. There were definitely times when I could see 10 or BPM off. Enough to effect what zone your in. And again, average wise it was not half bad.

So what does all this mean? First up for cycling, the Rhythm can not be worn on the leg for accurate heart rate data. I would also be skeptical that when worn on the leg that the Lifetrak Zoom HRV could be considered accurate enough for cycling. Now I admit to making a HUGE leap having done this test using a different monitor, but I have seen comments around the web that have also indicated that the Zoom on the legs accuracy on heart rate is BAD.

I asked Scosche about using the sensor on the leg, here is what they said: “Greetings John we have had customer use our monitor on their leg. As far as testing, no real testing has been performed on the leg application only the forearm.”

May 11, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Storage pools

Storage pools are not a new concept they have existed in the Unix/Linux world for a long time but finally entered the Windows world in Windows 8, and Server 2012 (I don’t think Server 2008 had them). In the past the size of a physical drive in turn translated into the drive letter. In the olden days people would even split drives into different drive letters, but this is a maintenance nightmare leading to space on one drive letter and none on the other. The idea of storage pools for the most part is convenience. To remove the limitations imposed by the physical size of the drive an thus on a given drive letter. You simply add drives into a pool and let the operating system manage what physical drive it’s on. Need more space, add another drive and increase the pool size. Gone are the days of shuffling around files between drives to balance or free space. You can also decide on a smaller size than that of the physical drive, to have redundancy (RAID). So for example on 2TB drives you could decide only 100G of that needs to be mirrored. All this is then managed by the volume manager. There are a couple of gotchas you need to be aware of with storage pools.

  • if you think your drive size could exceed 2TB (and is not starting above 2TB) be sure the partition table you choose is GPT not GUID or you will not be able to grow beyond it.
  • if you choose to use thin provisioning (allowing logical partitions to allocate space only as needed) be aware that if you end up running out of space this is REALLY not handled elegantly at all. Here’s an example. Windows thinks 10G is available but tells you it can not copy 1G. That would confuse most people:
    over-prov-fail

  • there is no way to change the RAID level of an existing partition. This one is a particularly HUGE issue. It means you basically need to start from a blank system with blank drives. Existing partitions/drives can NOT be added to a storage pool either. So you basically need to start green field, embrace storage pools, copy your stuff onto it and stay there until time ends.
  • logical drive sizes can be increased, but shrinking is dicey
  • performance is likely NOT going to be your motivator
  • performance of a RAID 5 stripe (done in software) on Windows is bad, I mean REALLY bad, I mean so bad don’t even think about it. Read is fine, writing is super slow.

Storage pools a super convenience that would take a HUGE leap of faith and cash to jump into, but once your there, the days of running out of space on this drive or the other would be long gone!

So where to get started? In Windows 8 in control panel search for Storage (it’s called Spaces in Windows 8, Windows Server calls it pools).

As you can see only unformatted blank disks can be entered into a new storage pool. Once the pool is created your now ready to create a storage space. A space in windows terms is a virtual drive. Here you specify if your looking for any redundancy, referred to as resiliency. This would allow you to tolerate a full drive failure (in the case of a mirror), but at the cost of space. Everything is written twice thus halving the space available.

You now have a shiny new drive letter. It’s worth noting if you choose simple (re resiliency) it’s even worse than that. Because your drive is actually stored across two drives (or more) potentially, you could loose everything if one drive failed. Not just what was on one drive. Now amplify this out and say you did simple over 5 drives (as an example). If any one of the 5 drives failed you could loose everything. This is a VERY bad choice, one that Windows sadly does not warn you about.

So now you decide, okay I am going to change the resiliency to add redundancy. Nope you can’t do that even if the drive is empty without deleting it and starting again.

So that’s about it, a little sneak peek into Storage pools/Spaces in Windows.

March 16, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Pokemon Gen 2 changes

Generation 2 of Pokemon is out and there’s lots of new characters, with the Pokedex now up to 242. I won’t go into the new characters, but I wanted to highlight some details on what’s new. I have briefly reviewed a few of the new Pokemon and have not found anything fight wise that is better than the previous Pokedex, ie, no better fighters are in the new characters.

Candies
There are new candies collected at Pokestops. Razz berries are the same old ones that are used to “make it easier to catch”. The Nanab berry is used to “calm it down” think a swinub running around of a Zubat flying in different directions. But the most useful one is the Pinap berry which increases the number of candies you get for catching the Pokemon! You can only use one berry at a time.

Stones
There are new stones collected at Pokestops. These stones are needed when evolving certain Pokemon.
The whole list is as follows:
Sun Stone (needed to evolve Gloom to Bellossom)
King’s Rock (needed to evolve Poliwhirl and Slowpoke to Sloking)
Metal Coat (needed to evolve Onix and Scyther)
Dubious disc (needed to evolve the Ploygon)
Dragon Scale (Needed to evolve Seadra)
Up-Grade

New Evolves:
An Evee now has two additional evolution possibilities, and like before you can manipulate these by renaming the Evee before you evolve it to Sakura and Tamao. In all:
Rename as Sakura to evolve into Psychic-type Espeon
Rename as Tamao to evolve into Dark-type Umbreon
Rename as Rainer to evolve into water type Vaporeon
Rename as Sparky to evolve into lightning type Jolteon
Rename as Pyro to evolve into fire type Flareon

A Gloom (which evolves from an Oddish) now evolves to Bellossom #182 if you have a Sun stone (one of the new stones found at Pokestops), otherwise it still evolves to Villeplum.

A Lickitung which previously had no evolution now evolves to a Lickilicky #463 once you learn rollout (which I have yet to sort out)

An Onix that previously had no evolution path now Evolves to a Steelix #208.

A Poliwhirl (which evolves from a Poliwag) can now evolve to Politoed #186 Poliwhirl with a kings rock (again one of the new stones found at a Pokestop), otherwise it still evolves to a Poliwrath.
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A Porygon which previously had no evolution path now evolves to a Porygon2 #233.
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A Scyther which previously had no evolution path now evolves to Scizor #212.
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A Seadra that previously had no evolution path now evolves to Kingdra #230 with Dragons scale (again one of the new stones you can find a pokestops).
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A Slowpoke now evolves to a Sloking #199 with Kings Rock (again one of the new stones you can find a pokestops) otherwise it still evolves to a Slowbro.
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As before: Mr Mime is exclusive to Europe, Farfetch’d can only be found in Asia, and Kangaskhan is available solely in Australia and New Zealand. Tauros is the North American exclusive. I don’t know of any new region specific pokemon. (So 3 not available in North America)

No legendary Pokemon are currently catchable. That accounts for the absence of five Pokemon – Mew and Mewtwo as well as the three birds of Articuno, Moltres and Zapdos. The Legendary Pokemon from Generation 2 are Raikou, Entei, Suicune, Lugia, Ho-Oh, and Celebi. You can expect to not find these in the game, as the legendaries from Generation 1 still haven’t appeared yet. (So a total of 10 legendaries).

This brings a total of 13 of the 242 unavailable so really the Pokedex consists of 229.

As I learn more I’ll update this page.

February 22, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Home power line adapters

I colleague at work had a pair of home power line network adapters so I borrowed them to play. The idea is that if you can’t pull a wire (or won’t) and can’t do wireless then this is a last choice solution to providing networking to a remote machine in your home, dorm or whatever. The way it works is it uses the power lines in your walls to create a network between the two adapters (you need at least a pair). The adapters work like a hub and create a link for you. You can put one next to your home router for example and that will allow you to have this network join your existing network in your home as well as to provide internet to the remote computer. The adapter have absolutely no configuration possible. They do not have a DHCP server so if you are not plugging into an existing home network then you will have to do manual IP address. The ones I tested provide one Ethernet wired connection and plug into the wall. The item is a little bulky so blocks the use of splitters/octupus, and they do not have passthru on them. They can not be plugged into surge suppressors or UPS because the transformers in these will block the signal. Security wise this is none. So be aware, while I have not proven it, it seems likely that your neighbor could purchase the same adapter and tap into your network (and your internet) without your knowledge. This is a bit troubling for me … To use this particular layout would require a wired ethernet adapter, something not all laptops have. Speed wise from these devices (which are VERY old) I got about 1MB/s when one was upstairs and the other downstairs. When they were right next to each other this picked up to about 3-4MB/s but either way a far cry below the advertised 85Mb/s (notice that’s bit/s). So in the end the work, are simple as pie to setup but are slow (well these ones are anyway).
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January 30, 2017 Posted by | Other reviews, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Converting old home movies

If your like me you have some old video tapes. Mine are home movies of my daughter when she was young. They are precious and I didn’t want to loose them. Some are more than 15 years old and I was concerned they would eventually degrade so I wanted to digitize them to keep them for all time, as well as make them more convenient to watch. So I looked around a bit and found a cheap USB video capture adapter on Amazon. It was supposed to come with uLead but came with a barely functional PVR from a company called Honetech. I dug out the VCR (actually had to borrow one from a friend the drive belt on mine had disintegrated), found the cables and hooked it up. The code once installed is super basic but does work. I didn’t bother trying to edit the captured video, rather simply pressed play and pause and separated the videos by topic. On default settings here are the capture settings:
parameters
The captured video ends up being 16.3M/min. So a 55 min video ends up around 900MB. This works out to only be around .27M/s so a USB 2 device is more than adequate. All of the encoding is done in hardware by the device so you don’t need anything too powerful to do the capture. The file once captured seems to require a video codec that isn’t there by default on Windows. Kodi had no issue playing it on a variety of platforms. DVD players also had no issues with it. At the end of the day the output is adequate and well worth the time to preserve important videos. The capture adapter was cheap, $20 so well worth it. Time wise it is very time consuming. 1hr takes 1hr (thanks Captain Obvious).
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January 30, 2017 Posted by | Mutlimedia, Other reviews, Uncategorized, Video Encoding | 2 Comments